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Trump Admin Distorts Facts on Terrorism to Push Xenophobic Agenda

Karen Greenberg was quoted in a Carbonated.TV article about U.S.-born terror suspects. The director of the Center on National Security at the Fordham University School of Law, Karen Greenberg, said the percentage of U.S.-born individuals indicted for terrorism is now 54 percent, which is far beyond the 27 percent conviction rate Trump administration touted in its report in

According to a new Survey, Most American Terrorists Are Born on Foreign Soil

Karen Greenberg was quoted in a Gazette article about the Justice Department’s recent report linking terrorism and immigration in the United States. The Fordham University Law School National Security center director, Karen Greenberg said that the evidence had been overshadowed by the report’s lengthy timeline. Greenberg added that the ISIS had used the tactic of

Experts Say Justice Department Manipulated Statistics on Percentage of Foreign-Born Terrorists

Karen Greenberg was quoted in the ABA Journal about the Justice Department’s recent report linking terrorism and immigration in the United States. Karen Greenberg, director of Fordham University’s Center on National Security, says the statistics included people who were captured after committing offenses abroad and brought to the United States for trial. The Justice Department did

Trump Administration Links Terrorism and Immigration, But an Expert Doubts the Math

Karen Greenberg was quoted in a Washington Post article about terrorism and immigration. President Trump has called for an end to the practice of letting naturalized U.S. citizens bring their relatives into the United States — critics call this “chain migration” — and for abolishing the “diversity lottery’’ for green cards. In releasing the report,

New Report Says Most U.S. Terrorists Foreign Born, But Check the Fine Print

Karen Greenberg was quoted in an NBC News article about U.S.-born terror suspects. Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at the Fordham University School of Law, said the long timeline of the report overshadows the evidence — and the effects — of a more recent tactic used by ISIS that has produced